Down the rabbit hole...

839 notes

cervvo:

“Vikings have always been portrayed as very heinous people and I love (Michael Hirst’s) approach on it. It made them family people and really gave them reasons as to why they do what they do. I wanted to be a part of something that sort of proves the myth wrong and proves their reputation wrong.”

cervvo:

“Vikings have always been portrayed as very heinous people and I love (Michael Hirst’s) approach on it. It made them family people and really gave them reasons as to why they do what they do. I wanted to be a part of something that sort of proves the myth wrong and proves their reputation wrong.”

(via jackspacepirate)

Filed under travis fimmel hot men vikings

337,601 notes

sarahsupastar:

absolute-bollocks:

half-doomed-and-semi-sweet:

koblala:

im-in-lesbians-with-tony-perry:

soliloquyn:

therothwoman:

Can we talk about how Hairspray is a story where a not-conventionally-attractive girl gets the hot guy in the end without having to Become “Pretty.” Because we need more stories like that.

It’s also story about breaking down the barriers of racism which we also need more of.

And it’s about nice hair and cheesy dance moves, more things we need more of

It’s a movie where John Travolta plays a chic, which we need more of

No. We don’t need more of men in roles which should have gone to plus size women.

Actually, the role was written as a man playing a woman because it’s a pantomime technique so it’s not like the movie purposely discriminated, It was literally just written that way and it’s probably one of my favourite comedic techniques.

Actually, the role was written as a man playing a woman because in the original Hairspray movie the role was played by Divine, a radical and influential plus-size drag queen. It is in honor of that original casting and in Divine’s memory that more recent stage and movie adaptations of Hairspray have continued to cast Mrs. Turnblad as a man in drag.

(Source: rouxx, via huntingthe-assbutt)

141,000 notes

mattharv666:

skankmcmeow:

I see your shifting gaze, that disgusted glance. I know you’re questioning my parenting from across the elementary school assembly.

Let me tell you a little story about the kindergarten student with bright purple hair, my little Raven Marie…

A month before school started she decided to play hair stylist with the craft scissors, and to save what was left I had to opt for a pixie cut. She was absolutely devastated. It was about three hours before she stopped her harsh sobbing and hiccups.

Why?

She has thought that the length of a girls hair was what made her “girly”. I know I’ve personally had many hairstyles around her before, including a purple mohawk, which many people criticized as not being “girly” enough. Media, other children, other parents, and society made it worse. She would randomly burst in tears while out in public for the first week of her new style, screaming that she looked like a boy. That everyone would think she’s a boy.

At one point she took off her bow in her hair, threw it at a cashier and screamed, “I DON’T NEED THIS BOW TO TELL YOU THAT I’M NOT A BOY, BECAUSE I’M NOT”

Proudly stomping away in her blue jean overalls, head held high.

Once we edged closer to the first day of school she kept asking questions like, “Do you think the other kids will like me? Do you think they’ll be my friend? Will they think I’m a boy? Will they pick on me because I have boy hair?”

So I went to the grocery store, bought some dye, and spent the whole night transforming my bright blonde little girl into a plum punk rock fairy. I then assured her that if any of the kids didn’t like her, they were just jealous.

As for you, mothers and teachers with the wandering eyes filled with disgust and judgement, I’m in the business of raising a free spirit.

Here’s to you, Raven Marie. I love you.

Look at how fucking adorable that kid is holy fucking shit

(via huntingthe-assbutt)